The same way that your car needs routine repairs and maintenance to stay reliable, jet engines need that same care. Unlike car repair shops, however, you aren’t likely to find your local jet engine repair shop down the street. Luckily, GE Aviation and CFM engines are supported by GE Aviation On Wing Support (OWS) — our version of the local rapid repair jet engine shop.

With eight repair stations and more than 300 technicians globally, OWS serves customers with 24/7 aircraft on ground (AOG) support and provides over 4,500 rapid repair solutions to more than 250 customers yearly. Field teams from any of the eight strategically placed customer care centers are equipped to travel anywhere in the world to perform maintenance and repairs within 24 hours of a customer request. By offering on-wing and facility-based quick turn services, OWS can save customers significant time and engine repair cost. It’s that flexibility and speed that empowers customers to reduce their operational costs and spend more time in the air.

Over the past two years, OWS’s capabilities have expanded tremendously to meet repair demands for GE’s growing installed engine base. Recent expansions have been instrumental in supporting OWS’s largest area of growth – the LEAP engine. In March 2018, GE Aviation opened a new operation base at the Dubai South Aviation District Aerospace Supply Chain Facility. This facility provides service to GE and CFM engine models for all regional-based airlines, with a specific focus on GE90, LEAP-1A and LEAP-1B engines. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, also saw an OWS base open in 2016 to deliver more efficient, reliable and timely repairs to customers across Latin America. Operations in Seoul, South Korea, are expanding as well, with the Seoul OWS facility positioned to double in size and workforce to meet Asia’s growing LEAP engine installed base.

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GE expects to continue to add highly skilled service technicians around the world to support the GE and CFM fleet. Service technicians typically have years of engine maintenance expertise with GE and CFM engines, allowing them to deliver surgeon-like precision to operations like borescope inspection and blade blending as well as removal, repair and replacement of line replaceable units (LRUs), fan modules, gearboxes and many other workscopes. Additionally, OWS offers quick engine changes, service inspections, service bulletin implementation, engine upgrades, off-wing module repairs and engine preservation.

One key piece of OWS’s success is its use of digital technology. With the GE-owned Service Max platform, OWS employees across the world are connected virtually to locate teams, equipment and issues, as well as manage work orders. Service Max allows OWS to operate a highly skilled and quality focused field service management operation that prioritizes efficiency and results for customers.

The Global Tooling Center in Batavia, Ohio, is another differentiator for OWS’s global operations. This facility includes 185,000 square feet of floor space with more than 25,000 engine maintenance tools. In addition, the Global Tooling Center has a machine shop, a new on-site calibration lab and digital technology to manage and track assets worldwide. The recent improvements in this facility complement OWS sites by enabling technicians to perform challenging repair and maintenance jobs in the field with confidence.

OWS holds FAA, EASA, CAAC and a host of other regulatory certifications to perform maintenance at many of the world’s busiest airports. Facilities are strategically located and partnered with Safran, ST Aerospace and Central European Engine Services to deliver services globally. With demand for MRO services on the rise, more regulatory certifications are in the works for OWS to deliver even more services in the future.